Category: forbidden planet

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Photo

Via Simple Jack

Via
Simple Jack

I’ve always found the DC (presumably &ld…

I’ve always found the DC (presumably “deceleration”) stations from Forbidden Planet (1956) to be interesting. While never elaborated on, the associated dialogue and visuals of the scene suggest that the even the C-57D’s artificial gravity is unequal to the task of protecting the crew completely from the inertial forces of dropping from 16 times the speed of light to 0.3896c in a few seconds and that the stations are tightly confined inertial dampening fields.

Even after the stations deactivate, the men seem to be in some physical discomfort implying that they feel some deceleration forces even through the DC station fields.

It’s a bit surprising how infrequently acceleration and deceleration forces in space travel are realistically addressed in science fiction. The fluid-filled inertia tanks in Joe Haldeman’s “The Forever War” (1974) is the primary other example that immediately comes to mind other than the more prosaic “acceleration chair/couch” found in “The Mote in God’s Eye” (1974) by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle and the similar “shock couches” of the 1950s EC Comics’ science fiction titles.

I wish this were real.

I wish this were real.

Forbidden Planet

Forbidden Planet

Robby The Robot

Robby The Robot

Art by Eric Joyner

Art by Eric Joyner

It’s no secret that “Forbidden Planet” (1956) greatly…

It’s no secret that “Forbidden Planet” (1956) greatly influenced “Star Trek”. But this one is almost certainly just a coincidence.

Via Nash Mau

Via Nash Mau

If Old School Sci Fi had a soundtrack, these two would be the…

If Old School Sci Fi had a soundtrack, these two would be the composers. Meet Bebe and Louis Barron, pioneers in the field of electronic music. Before synthesizers and computers made electronic music easy, innovators like the Barrons had to invent not just the sound but the technology to make a new form of music possible.

Perhaps best known for their score for Forbidden Planet (1956), a series of otherworldly melodies in which music and sound effects melt into one another, legal entanglements forced the duo’s credit for the film to read “Electronic Tonalities” rather than music, robbing the couple of consideration for an Oscar.